The UK does not spend a disproportionate amount on benefits

OK, I know I’m a bit late to this party, but even by the standards of government publications, this paragraph from George Osborne’s recent Summer Budget (section 3.4) is a stinker:

However, despite progress during the last Parliament there is still more to do. Taxpayers are still being asked to pay for welfare expenditure that remains disproportionately high. 7% of global expenditure on social protection is spent in the UK, despite the fact that the UK produces 4% of global GDP and has only 1% of the world’s population. As chart 1.14 shows, spending on working-age welfare has increased significantly in real terms over the last few decades. Too many families continue to be trapped on benefits. The Budget sets out the next stage of welfare reform, delivering on the government’s commitment to save £12 billion from the working age welfare bill.

I’m not sure where these figures came from, but there are very plausible. It would in fact be surprising if the UK did not spend a “disproportionate” amount on social protection (broadly speaking, public pensions, social care and benefits) when compared to the whole world. Many people living in developing countries are in desperate need of social protection, either because they are too ill to work, there are no jobs available, or for any number of other reasons. But they don’t have access to it. The governments of these countries may be corrupt and not care about the needs of large proportions of the population, or they may simply lack the infrastructure needed to collect enough taxes to provide meaningful social protection. Western countries are much richer than the world as a whole and have much stronger institutions, so they are able to spend more than the global average on social protection. This is a good thing.

So it is a nonsense to compare the UK to the global average. This is the wrong comparator group and sets a laughably low ambition for what a government can do to enhance the welfare of its citizens. It makes more sense to compare the UK to other OECD countries.

Spending on social protection as a % of GDP in OECD countries

The figures look rather as you would expect. The UK spends a smaller share of its wealth on social protection than almost all other rich European countries. If we are spending a disproportionate amount on this, spare a thought for the poor French! The Summer Budget figures imply that they account for 11% of global social protection spending and only 4% of global GDP.

There is one country that clearly bucks this trend. The US is a very rich country (GDP per capita is nearly 50% higher than in the UK) but it spends relatively little on social protection. However, while the US is a great country that UK would do well to emulate in many areas, it is not a leading light in the field of social protection. To take a random example, women in the US get precisely zero paid maternity leave.

To summarise: the UK does not spend a disproportionate amount on social protection. In fact, we spend less than most comparable countries in Europe. Nonetheless, the US shows that it’s possible to spend a smaller proportion of GDP on these things, but we might have to become 50% richer and cancel maternity leave to achieve it.

Reasonable arguments can be made for reforming parts of our benefits system, but this is one of the weakest and most disingenuous I have seen. While it is careful to stop short of telling an outright, falsifiable lie, its purpose is clear: it is seeking to mislead the reader. Although it removes the risk of that gotcha moment when a full-blown lie is exposed, seeking to mislead is morally equivalent to lying and politicians should be called out for it more often.

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